The Enki Pro HyperSense gaming chair has a powerful haptic motor.

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Razer has decided that enough is enough of this passive sitting nonsense. You must feel the game through your entire body. for that, it’s joined together with D-box which makes haptic devices ranging from movie seats, to themed park attractions to put a device inside the Razer Enki gaming chair, which will literally kick your arse.

Its Enki Pro HyperSense appears to be the same as your typical gaming chair. It’s offered in black and green stitching, and decorated by an Razer snakehead’s logo on the backrest. It’s wrapped in a tough material that has an imitation carbon fibre finish. Furthermore, as it’s Razer it’s headrest that’s also chroma-enabled, with RGB lighting.

It’s interesting to examine the seat support and base, which is where you can see the HyperSense component, which is A haptic engine comprised of motors, pulleys and levers. It can recreate an array of “vibrations, textures, and motions” and provides tactile feedback of up to 1 G-Force. It’s not quite rocket propulsion system, but with enough force to feel it.

Razer announces F1 2021Forza Horizon 5 Razer touts F1 2021, Forza Horizon 5 and ACR Valhalla as supported natively, as well as it claims that Enki Pro HyperSense can be found by “2,200 games, movies and music titles”. However, we’re not getting all details on what this means regarding what the chair’s response will be in these situations.

The chair can be used with games that aren’t supported by the software, but “where controller, keyboard, and mouse-inputs will generate physical feedback when used.” Similar to other unknown “popular streaming platforms” which could be automatically supported.

In fact, I can think there is a lot of appeal to the device in racing games. When you combine it with the force feedback provided by some of the top racing wheels You’ll observe when you go over too far of a a curb, and get caught in a gravel pit.

But, outside of VR, perhaps I’m more skeptical about its potential benefits. I’ve had a few issues using haptic headsets, but discovered that I’d like to block that feature to the greatest extent possible.

Perhaps it’s not too late. Razer Enki Pro Hypersense isn’t suitable for everyone, but maybe certain people will discover that its haptics integrated are just what we want from our bodies. If you’re one of them, then you’ll need to keep an eye on this version of the Enki Pro HyperSense, as we don’t have a confirmed date of release for this model as of yet.

The concept is technically not yet a reality however, it’s not named one and appears to be reasonably well-finished that I’m sure it will be developed, if at all, in a small production. You can sign up to receive notifications via Razer’s website. Razer web site for those who want to be kept informed at all times.

If you’ve got a gaming chair that’s ready and you’re looking to add a the haptic impact yourself this concept of a gaming chair/haptic isn’t a new idea. ButtKicker is a thought that comes to mind as an ideal alternative that is able to be fitted to most chairs. It can also serve as a simulator rig haptic motor when you’ve taken speed to the next step. Razer’s haptic configuration that comes with D-Box certainly looks more embedded into the chair, however, the sole test of who has the most rumble will be your tush.