Thursday, December 8, 2022

World No 1 Tech News Website

AMD hack due to some of its passwords being just ‘password’

Must read

fatima khan
fatima khanhttps://myelectricsparks.com/fatima-khan/
A brand new writer in the fields, Fatima has been taken under my electric spark's RGB- rich and ensures she doesn't engage in excessive snark on the website. It's unclear what command and Conquer are; however, she can talk for hours about the odd rhythm games, hardware, product reviews, and MMOs that were popular in the 2000s. Fatima has been creating various announcements, previews, and other content while here, but particularly enjoys writing regarding Products' latest news in the market she's currently addicted to. She is likely talking to an additional blogger with her current obsession right now.

An extortion group known as RansomHouse claims to have more than 450Gb of hacked data from AMD. What’s surprising about this latest hack is that the group appears to have acquired this data thanks to AMD using rediculously simple passwords to protect its network from intrusion.

Apparently, at least some of the passwords used were no more complex than ‘password.’ Yeah, your read that right. It’s 2022 and major corporations are still using ‘password’ for sensitive information. I’m guessing ‘123456’ was one of them, considering some of the startlingly dumb passwords corpos have been caught using recently.

RansomHouse claims that the data was taken back in January 2022 and has provided a data sample as evidence of the hack, which you can view over on Restore Privacy, which originally ran the news. That site has reviewed some of the data, but it isn’t clear if the data is genuine or not, so this attack is still officially unverified.

RansomHouse states that it has nothing to do with the breach itself and doesn’t produce ransomware or encrypt data, and instead acts as a “professional mediator.” It’s a fairly new outfit, that appears to have started in December 2021 and lists six companies that it has hacked data from, with AMD being the latest.

It’s worth noting that small ‘b’ after the amount of data stolen as well, as that means gigabits and not gigabytes. 450Gb is just over 56GB of data, assuming that it isn’t just a typo in the first place. That isn’t a lot, especially for a company as big as AMD, but it obviously depends on what that data pertains to as to how valuable it is.

AMD reached out to our sister site, Tom’s Hardware, to confirm the following, “AMD is aware of a bad actor claiming to be in possession of stolen data from AMD. An investigation is currently underway.”

It’ll be interesting to see how AMD responds going forward, and ultimately whether it’s willing to pay up to protect the data. The company should probably change a few of its passwords either way. Something we should all do, to be honest. Here’s a password guide in case you’re now sweating in your seat.

FTC: We use income earning auto affiliate links For More info Click Here.

More articles

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Latest article